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Revised 2010-04-06

Bounty Logbook Jan 11, 1788

(38

HKFCoursesWindsRems. Friday 11th. Jany 1788     
1"""ESEModerate Breezes & Clear Wr. Fired a Gun a Sigl. for Sailing. Got under way and at 3 the Town of St. Cruz bore North 7 Miles. Set Steerg Sails and made all Sail.
2
3
45SoEBS
554
65"SWBS"The SW End of Grand Canary SEBS, NEt. part of St. Cruz Road NEBN. At ½ past 6 a round lump of land like an Isld. on the SE part of Tenariff bore true West 4 leagues.
76
856
951
102
2

4

SWBW

SBE

Taken aback. Wr. Cloudy.
1132SW½S
1224SWSSELight Squalls of Rain.
126SWBS
232
344"SEBE
454"SEModt. & Cloudy Wr.
556
654
762
862""Fresh Breezes & Cloudy. After Clearing Ship fore and Aft and every Officers Cabbin, the People were employed in making Matts & Spunyarn.
97
107
1172
1272SWSSEDo. Wr. I now Ordered the People to be served a pint of Wine pr. Man & put them to 2/3 Allowance of Bread. Served Fresh Meat.
112
1806
1918
 LatitudeLongitudeRems. at Noon
CourseDistObsdD. R.D. R.T. K.L. & T. K.Therr. 64½°
So14°W11626°34′N26°36′N16°48′W  

39)

Remarks

The Weather altho very fine was not so favorable over the Land as to enable us to see any thing of the Famous Pic. As we advanced towards the SE extremity of Tenariff, a small lump of land became very conspicuous as an Island, which particularly surprised me as no Map had taken the least Notice of it, but by 6 oClock having sent an Officer to the Mast head he acquainted me it joined to the Main by low land, from whence it ranges gradually up to the Pic. From the latd of St. Cruz at ½ past 6 when the SEt point of the Island bore true West I deduce its Latitude to be 28°..06′No.

I now Ordered my people to be at three Watches, and gave the Charge of the Third Watch to a Mr. Fletcher Christian one of my Mates. I have ever considered this among Seamen as Conducive to health, and not being Jaded by keeping on Deck every other four hours, it adds much to their Content and Chearfulness. Some time for relaxation and Mirth is absolutely necessary, and I have considered it so much so that after 4 oClock, the Evening is laid aside for their Amusement and dancing. I had great difficulty before I left England to get a Man to play the Violin and I prefered at last to take One two thirds Blind than come without one.

As 2/3 allowance of bread is as much as Men generally consume I Ordered them to be put to it on this day, and as their Water is all filtered through Dripstones which I have procured for that purpose, few Seamen & Officers I may venture to Say can ever boast of more Comforts at Sea.


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